fate keeps on happening

I like the way the future happens in front of other stuff... like today and yesterday. Interests: animals, art, astronomy, audiodrama, books, brain science, buddhism, detectives, diy, film, gaming, history, humor, learning, libraries, lovecraft, music, mystery, nature, podcasts, sci fi, technology, travel & weirdos.
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Nikola Tesla was talking about his student days at Prague.

“I remember well at Prague,” he said, “an old professor of great originality and acumen. This professor insisted on the value of a free use of the perceptive faculties, and he was always pointing out the need for this use in strange ways.

“One day, on arising to lecture, he began: ‘Gentlemen, you do not use your faculties of observation as you should.’

“He laid on the table before him a pot, filled with some vile-smelling chemical compound – a thick, brown stuff.

“’When I was a student,’ he went on, ‘I did not fear to use my sense of taste.’

“He dipped his finger deep into the pot and then stuck the finger in his mouth.

“’Taste it, gentlemen. Taste it,’ he said, smiling grimly.

“The evil pot passed round the class, and one after another we dipped our fingers in it and then sucked them clean. The taste of the thick brown compound was horrible. We made wry faces and spluttered. The professor watched us with a grim smile.

“When the pot was finally returned to him, his thin lips parted, and he gave a dry chuckle.

“’I must repeat gentlemen.’ he said, ‘that you do not use your faculties of observation. If you had looked more closely at me you would have observed that the finger I put in my mouth was not the one I dipped into the pot.’”

New-York Tribune, 27 Nov 1904, pg 11-12

One of the disturbing images from Orbis Sensualium Pictus aka The World of Things Obvious to the Senses drawn in Pictures. Widely regarded asthe first children’s picture book— published in the mid 17th-century by John Comenius. See more at The Public Domain Review.

"I would like to talk with you, my dear sir," he said, "but I feel far from well to-day. I am completely worn out, in fact, and yet I cannot stop my work. These experiments of mine are so important, so beautiful, so fascinating, that I can hardly tear myself away from them to eat, and when I try to sleep I think about them constantly. I expect I shall go on until I break down altogether."

Nikola Tesla speaking to Walter T Stephenson for the article, Nikola Tesla and the Electric Light of the Future published in The Outlook 9 March 1895.

As the Buddha said 2,500 years ago, we’re all out of our fucking minds. That’s just the way we are.
Psychotherapist Albert Ellis as quoted by journalist and author Oliver Burkeman in The Guardian article Discovering the secret of happiness10/6/2006.

Sherlock Holmes: Crimes and Punishments will be released in September and it shall be mine. Here is the latest trailer via Adventure Gamers and the previous four videos. Also, the developer blog is a fun read.

I imagine that just like The Testament of Sherlock Holmes, I will be forced to zoom in on hideous wounds in order to gather evidence. And, as in that same title, I will wave my arms around making “Ech! Bleah!” noises as I do so. But I will plunge on to victory. And so there.

Does it always come to this? Did I have to come to this to see the bitter truth of it, a tissue of lies, and like all tissues easily sodden with tears, or blood.
The Ghost (In Two Letters) by Tanith Lee

expressions-of-nature:

Holiday Bouquet / Mt. Jefferson, Oregon by: Alan Howe

Incredible!

(via magicalnaturetour)

  • Mike: I just thought of an amazing Christmas gift, Will!
  • Will: What's that?
  • Mike: A Jamesian Christmas cracker! Instead of a crap joke and a fun fact and a party hat, it's got some sinister stuff in it like... some nail clippings and some hair!
  • Will: And instead of some crap pun, it's got a note with some runes on it and you go, "Awesome! Three months to live!"
Love is like a putrescible stench that follows you everywhere. Eventually you get used to it without gagging and then one day, it’s gone forever and you’re utterly alone.
Alison Dalton reveals her romantic side in Our Fair City ep 5.7.
There are few things more beautiful than a full September moon shining on the smooth lawns and dark trees of an English garden, and on the oak-grown slopes of an English park. The tide of the year’s life is at the full - just past the full [and on the turn]: there is a lucid interval before death, before the great winds set in and the funereal pomp of the woods is put on. Humphreys felt something of the delight and the foreboding of the time when he threw open his bedroom window that night. Absolute stillness: everything might have been holding its breath and listening for the first whisper of a breeze from the distant sea.
John Humphreys by M.R. James
There’s nothing like gazing into the maw of death to rid you of any cheery resignation you might’ve had towards it before you actually got there.
Lord Underwood
Underwood & Flinch: Blood and Smoke by Mike Bennett

Near Harford Farm in Norfolk. Photo by author David Senior. Check his blog EastScapes for more beautiful shots.

Dr Herbert West advises his hapless assistant, Andrew Snidge, that he must take drastic steps to retrieve his undead creation.

Dr West: After what happened last time, well, I swore I would never create another army of the undead.

Andrew: Why?! What… what happened last time?

Dr West: Do you remember when I taught you that if you aren’t constantly in danger of obliterating everything you know, you aren’t really doing science?

Andrew: …yeah…

Dr West: I was really doing science.

Our Fair City

wilburwhateley:

John Coulthart’s illustration for Remnants by Fred Chappell.

A portion of Coulthart’s summary: A small family group are among the Earth’s last remaining human survivors after the Old Ones have commandeered the planet, their lives reduced to scrabbling for food and hiding from roaming shoggoths.

Beautiful.

wilburwhateley:

John Coulthart’s illustration for Remnants by Fred Chappell.

A portion of Coulthart’s summary: A small family group are among the Earth’s last remaining human survivors after the Old Ones have commandeered the planet, their lives reduced to scrabbling for food and hiding from roaming shoggoths.

Beautiful.

"The pen is mightier than the sword", as explained by Dr Herbert West in Our Fair City.

It means that while your opponent makes a sword, you could be using your pen to design a formula to reanimate flesh-hungry corpses to EAT your opponent… and possibly his sword, as well.